Accident de Havilland Canada CC-138 Twin Otter (DHC-6) 13803, Monday 11 March 2019
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Date:Monday 11 March 2019
Time:
Type:Silhouette image of generic DHC6 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different    
de Havilland Canada CC-138 Twin Otter (DHC-6)
Owner/operator:Royal Canadian Air Force - RCAF
Registration: 13803
MSN: 305
Year of manufacture:1971
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 7
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Substantial
Category:Accident
Location:140 km N Inuvik, NT -   Canada
Phase: Landing
Nature:Military
Departure airport:
Destination airport:
Confidence Rating: Accident investigation report completed and information captured
Narrative:
The aircraft departed Tuktoyaktuk, NT with four crew and three scientists on board for a mission requiring the aircraft to land on unprepared sea ice surfaces. After completing an uneventful landing on sea ice near Tuktoyaktuk for scientific research, they flew the aircraft to Pelly Island located 50 miles to the West. The crew first completed two reconnaissance patterns above the sea ice surface to assess wind and surface conditions. The crew then conducted a final pass and chose an into-wind approach for landing on the sea ice, approximately 1 nautical mile from the island. The aircraft touched down on a smooth area of sea ice but then bounced into the air after contacting a drift perpendicular to the aircraft’s heading. The aircraft impacted the base of a larger drift once it settled back onto the sea ice. The nose landing gear collapsed and the aircraft came to a stop shortly thereafter.
The aircraft sustained very serious damage, with damage to multiple major components as a result of the impact with the snow drifts. No personnel were injured in the accident and all were subsequently evacuated to Inuvik, NT by civilian helicopter.

The investigation concluded that the crew did not see the drifts during the two reconnaissance patterns, during the final pass, nor when on approach for landing. The high cirrus cloud layer that obscured the sun contributed to the difficulty in assessing the sea ice surface.

Sources:

CBC

Revision history:

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