Runway excursion Accident Boeing 727-95 N1963, Tuesday 27 April 1976
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Date:Tuesday 27 April 1976
Time:15:10
Type:Silhouette image of generic B721 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different    
Boeing 727-95
Owner/operator:American Airlines
Registration: N1963
MSN: 19837/499
Year of manufacture:1967
Total airframe hrs:21926 hours
Engine model:Pratt & Whitney JT8D-7A
Fatalities:Fatalities: 37 / Occupants: 88
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Destroyed, written off
Category:Accident
Location:Saint Thomas-Harry S. Truman Airport (STT) -   U.S. Virgin Islands
Phase: Landing
Nature:Passenger - Scheduled
Departure airport:New York-John F. Kennedy International Airport, NY (JFK/KJFK)
Destination airport:Saint Thomas-Harry S.Truman Airport (STT/TIST)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Confidence Rating: Accident investigation report completed and information captured
Narrative:
American Airlines Flight 625 was a scheduled flight from Providence Airport (PVD) to St.Thomas (STT) on the U.S Virgin Islands with an intermediate stop in New York (JFK). The Boeing 727 departed New York at 12:00 AST. On approach to St. Thomas, at 15:04, the flight crew cancelled their IFR flight plan and proceeded VFR. The captain elected to use the runway 09 ILS for vertical guidance. The glide slope was intercepted at 1500 feet msl (flaps 15deg and at a 160 KIAS airspeed). The flaps were lowered to 25 and later to 30 degrees. The company prescribed 40 degrees was never selected. The speed was still 10 KIAS above Vref when the aircraft passed the threshold at an estimated altitude of 30-40 feet. At 1000 feet down the runway, while initiating the flare, turbulence caused the right wing to drop. The wings were leveled and the aircraft floated a while until touchdown 2200-2300 feet down the runway. The captain decided that the aircraft couldn't be stopped on the remaining runway. He immediately initiated a go-around. Because of the absence of any sensation either of power being applied or of aircraft acceleration, the throttles were closed again. The aircraft, in a 11 degree nose up attitude, ran off the runway and struck a localizer antenna. The right wingtip clipped a hillside just south of the antenna and the aircraft continued, hit an embankment, became airborne and contacted the ground on the opposite side of the perimeter road. The aircraft continued and came to rest 83 feet past the perimeter road, bursting into flames.

PROBABLE CAUSE: "The captain's actions and his judgment in initiating a go-around maneuver with insufficient runway remaining after a long touchdown. The long touchdown is attributed to a deviation from prescribed landing techniques and an encounter with an adverse wind condition, common at the airport. The non-availability of information about the aircraft's go-around performance capabilities may have been a factor in the captain's abortive attempt to go-around a long landing."

Accident investigation:
  
Investigating agency: NTSB
Report number: DCA76AZ025
Status: Investigation completed
Duration: 1 year and 3 months
Download report: Final report

Sources:


Statistics

  • 22nd worst accident in 1976
  • 18th worst accident of this aircraft type
  • 10th worst accident of this aircraft type at the time

Location

Images:


photo (c) NTSB; Saint Thomas-Harry S. Truman Airport (STT); April 1976; (publicdomain)


photo (c) NTSB; Saint Thomas-Harry S. Truman Airport (STT) (publicdomain)


photo (c) NTSB; Saint Thomas-Harry S. Truman Airport (STT) (publicdomain)


photo (c) Bob Garrard (publicdomain)

Revision history:

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