Accident de Havilland Canada DHC-6 Twin Otter 100 N6383, Thursday 9 January 1975
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Date:Thursday 9 January 1975
Time:16:07
Type:Silhouette image of generic DHC6 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different    
de Havilland Canada DHC-6 Twin Otter 100
Owner/operator:Golden West Airlines
Registration: N6383
MSN: 83
Year of manufacture:1967
Total airframe hrs:10092 hours
Engine model:Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-20
Fatalities:Fatalities: 12 / Occupants: 12
Other fatalities:2
Aircraft damage: Destroyed, written off
Category:Accident
Location:Whittier, CA -   United States of America
Phase: Approach
Nature:Passenger - Scheduled
Departure airport:Ontario International Airport, CA (ONT/KONT)
Destination airport:Los Angeles International Airport, CA (LAX/KLAX)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Confidence Rating: Accident investigation report completed and information captured
Narrative:
Golden West Flight 261 departed Ontario, CA at 15:56PST for a VFR flight to Los Angeles. At 16:04 the crew contacted LAX arrival and reported over Rose Hills. The flight was then cleared for the Terminal Control Area (TCA) and no. 2 arrival to runway 24L. At 16:05 the crew were advised that they had traffic 5,5nm in front of them climbing from 1500 to 3000 feet which was a police helicopter on a VFR flight. The arrival controller transmitted another advisory about the helicopter at 16:06, but there was no response. It appeared the Twin Otter had collided in flight at 2200 feet with a Cessna 150 aircraft (N11421). The Twin Otter was flying on a 250deg heading descending 300 feet/min at 146 knots airspeed while the Cessna was flying at 94 kts; the closing speed was 174 kts. The Cessna, operated by CessnAir Aviation had departed from Long Beach on a local training flight at 15:46. Both aircraft crashed. Debris caused some damage to houses and lawns near the crash site.

PROBABLE CAUSE: "The failure of both flight crews to see the other aircraft in sufficient time to initiate evasive action. The Board is unable to determine why each crew failed to see an avoid the other aircraft; however, the Board believes that the ability of both crews to detect the other aircraft in time to avoid a collision was reduced because of the position of the sun, the closure angle of the aircraft, and the necessity for the Twin Otter's fight crew to acquire visual contact with radar-reported traffic directly in front of them."

Accident investigation:
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Investigating agency: NTSB
Report number: NTSB/AAR-75-14
Status: Investigation completed
Duration: 7 months
Download report: Final report

Sources:

ICAO Aircraft Accident Digest, Circular 146-AN/96 (3-12)

Statistics

  • 31st worst accident in 1975
  • 58th worst accident of this aircraft type
  • 5th worst accident of this aircraft type at the time

Location

Images:


photo (c) Airview

Revision history:

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