Accident Douglas DC-3A N485, Saturday 27 November 1965
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Date:Saturday 27 November 1965
Time:
Type:Silhouette image of generic DC3 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different    
Douglas DC-3A
Owner/operator:Edde Airlines
Registration: N485
MSN: 4848
Year of manufacture:1942
Engine model:Pratt & Whitney R-1830
Fatalities:Fatalities: 13 / Occupants: 13
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Destroyed, written off
Category:Accident
Location:35 km S of Salt Lake City, UT -   United States of America
Phase: Take off
Nature:Passenger - Non-Scheduled/charter/Air Taxi
Departure airport:Salt Lake City International Airport, UT (SLC/KSLC)
Destination airport:Provo Airport, UT (PVU/KPVU)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Confidence Rating: Accident investigation report completed and information captured
Narrative:
N485 was prepared for a flight from Salt Lake City to Albuquerque with an intermediate stop in Provo. Prior to departure the crew requested Provo weather. Since this was not available the pilot then requested Salt Lake City weather information. The 06:00 weather report included 1600 feet overcast, visibility 5 miles in light snow showers. The forecast until 09:00 included sky obscured, 800 feet overcast and a one mile visibility. At 07:02 the flight was cleared for a runway 34 departure and special VFR after departure. The aircraft took off at 07:07 and was under Radar surveillance until 07:11. After that ground witnesses saw the DC-3 pass overhead at low altitude (200-500 feet). It was snowing at that time and visibility was poor. The aircraft headed for sharply rising terrain of Camp Williams Military Reserve. The DC-3 struck the 12-degree upslope of a hill at 5449 feet msl, 11 feet below the crest. The right wing separated the remainder of the aircraft continued 1202 feet over the hill, crashing at an elevation of 5275 feet msl (1608 m) against the 25-degree upslope of another hill.

PROBABLE CAUSE: "Pilot attempted visual flight under unfavourable weather and terrain conditions, resulting in position disorientation and flight at an altitude too low to clear obstructing terrain. Judgement of the pilot in command in initiating a VFR flight operation under existing weather conditions and terrain environment."

Accident investigation:
  
Investigating agency: NTSB
Report number: DEN66A0038
Status: Investigation completed
Duration: 4 months
Download report: Final report

Sources:


Statistics

  • 56th worst accident in 1965
  • 446th worst accident of this aircraft type
  • 369th worst accident of this aircraft type at the time

Revision history:

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