Accident Cessna 172M N80859, Tuesday 14 February 2006
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Date:Tuesday 14 February 2006
Time:11:10 LT
Type:Silhouette image of generic C172 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different    
Cessna 172M
Owner/operator:French Valley Aviation, Inc.
Registration: N80859
MSN: 66776
Engine model:Textron Lycoming O-320-E2D
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Substantial
Category:Accident
Location:Murrieta, California -   United States of America
Phase: Unknown
Nature:Training
Departure airport:Murrieta, CA (F70)
Destination airport:Murrieta, CA (F70)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Confidence Rating: Accident investigation report completed and information captured
Narrative:
The airplane landed hard in a field adjacent to the airport during an attempted takeoff. The purpose of the solo flight was for the student pilot to perform practice touch-and-go takeoff and landings. After completing a normal takeoff, he continued around the traffic pattern and then preformed a normal landing. During the landing rollout he retracted the flaps, input full throttle, and pushed the mixture control partially forward, leaving it out about 7/8 inch. The airplane lifted off the runway surface and climbed to about 50 to 100 feet above ground level (agl), with an airspeed of about 60 knots. The airplane was not able to maintain the airspeed and the student pilot thought the engine was only producing partial power. While performing a precautionary landing in an open field the airplane landed hard. Post accident examinations by both the operator and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) inspector revealed no evidence of engine or airframe anomalies that would have precluded normal operation. The FAA inspector stated that the signatures on the spark plugs indicated a very lean condition. An engine run was conducted the day following accident and the FAA inspector ran the engine noting no discrepancies.

Probable Cause: a partial loss of engine power resulting from the student pilot's mismanagement of the mixture control.

Accident investigation:
cover
  
Investigating agency: NTSB
Report number: LAX06CA115
Status: Investigation completed
Duration: 3 months
Download report: Final report

Sources:

NTSB LAX06CA115

Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
09-Oct-2022 07:07 ASN Update Bot Added

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