Accident Schweizer 269C-1 (300CB) N3275M, Wednesday 6 January 2010
ASN logo
 
This information is added by users of ASN. Neither ASN nor the Flight Safety Foundation are responsible for the completeness or correctness of this information. If you feel this information is incomplete or incorrect, you can submit corrected information.

Date:Wednesday 6 January 2010
Time:18:30
Type:Silhouette image of generic H269 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different    
Schweizer 269C-1 (300CB)
Owner/operator:Chesapeake Bay Helicopters
Registration: N3275M
MSN: 0159
Year of manufacture:2003
Total airframe hrs:7193 hours
Engine model:Lycoming HO-360
Fatalities:Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 1
Other fatalities:0
Aircraft damage: Substantial
Category:Accident
Location:Near Amish Road and Route 68, Grantsville, MD -   United States of America
Phase: En route
Nature:Ferry/positioning
Departure airport:Orange, VA (OMH)
Destination airport:Monogahela, PA (FWQ)
Investigating agency: NTSB
Confidence Rating: Accident investigation report completed and information captured
Narrative:
While en route to the destination airport, the pilot made a stop to fuel the helicopter and check the weather. According to the pilot, no precipitation was predicted for his route of flight, the winds were expected from the northwest at 15 knots, and a cloud ceiling of 2,500 feet broken was forecasted. He stated that no specific windshear or turbulence was forecasted. The pilot continued the flight and noted that the wind became stronger over the mountains. He decided he would land the helicopter after he passed over the second ridge; however, as he continued, "strong windshear" lifted the helicopter and then "dropped it to the ground." The pilot reported no pre-impact mechanical anomalies with the helicopter. He also reported approximately 600 hours of total flight experience, all of which were in make and model of the accident helicopter. Examination of recorded weather information revealed AIRMET TANGO for turbulence was in effect for the pilot's route of flight.
Probable Cause: The pilot's loss of aircraft control after encountering turbulence over a mountain range. Contributing to the accident was the pilot's failure to obtain an Airmet for turbulence along the route of flight prior to departure and while enroute.

Accident investigation:
cover
  
Investigating agency: NTSB
Report number: ERA10CA109
Status: Investigation completed
Duration: 5 months
Download report: Final report

Sources:

NTSB

Location

Revision history:

Date/timeContributorUpdates
07-Jan-2010 10:29 Anon. Added
07-Jan-2010 12:03 RobertMB Updated [Time, Aircraft type, Registration, Cn, Operator, Location, Phase, Destination airport, Source, Damage]
21-Dec-2016 19:25 ASN Update Bot Updated [Time, Damage, Category, Investigating agency]
26-Nov-2017 12:31 ASN Update Bot Updated [Operator, Other fatalities, Nature, Departure airport, Destination airport, Source, Narrative]
22-Jan-2020 10:45 Anon. Updated [Operator]

Corrections or additions? ... Edit this accident description

The Aviation Safety Network is an exclusive service provided by:
Quick Links:

CONNECT WITH US: FSF on social media FSF Facebook FSF Twitter FSF Youtube FSF LinkedIn FSF Instagram

©2024 Flight Safety Foundation

1920 Ballenger Av, 4th Fl.
Alexandria, Virginia 22314
www.FlightSafety.org